FSL Depth to Slowly Permeable Horizon

4204
162
Added
07 Jun 2010

This dataset was first added to LRIS Portal on 07 Jun 2010.

The New Zealand Fundamental Soil Layer originates from a relational join of features from two databases: the New Zealand Land Resource Inventory (NZLRI), and the National Soils Database (NSD). The NZLRI is a national polygon database of physical land resource information, including a soil unit. Soil is one in an inventory of five physical factors (including rock, slope, erosion, and vegetation) delineated by physiographic polygons at approximately 1:50,000 scale. The NSD is a point database of soil physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics for over 1500 soil profiles nationally. A relational join between the NZLRI dominant soil and derivative tables from the NSD was the means by which 14 important soil attributes were attached to the NZLRI polygons. Some if these attributes originate from exact matches with NSD records, while others derive from matches to similar soils or professional estimates. This layer contains depth to slowly permeable horizon attributes. Depth to a slowly permeable horizon describes the minimum and maximum depths (in metres) to a horizon in which the permeability is less than 4mm/hr as measured by techniques outlined in Griffiths (1985). If no slowly permeable horizon is observed, the taxon is allocated to Class 6 and a null value with numeric code -.99 is entered into the data fields. These classes, described more fully in Webb and Wilson (1995).

Layer ID 48108
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 107298
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

FSL Soil Temperature Regime

8385
388
Added
04 Jun 2010

This dataset was first added to LRIS Portal on 04 Jun 2010.

The New Zealand Fundamental Soil Layer originates from a relational join of features from two databases: the New Zealand Land Resource Inventory (NZLRI), and the National Soils Database (NSD). The NZLRI is a national polygon database of physical land resource information, including a soil unit. Soil is one in an inventory of five physical factors (including rock, slope, erosion, and vegetation) delineated by physiographic polygons at approximately 1:50,000 scale. The NSD is a point database of soil physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics for over 1500 soil profiles nationally. A relational join between the NZLRI dominant soil and derivative tables from the NSD was the means by which 14 important soil attributes were attached to the NZLRI polygons. Some if these attributes originate from exact matches with NSD records, while others derive from matches to similar soils or professional estimates. The layers contains the soil temperature regime attribute. The soil temperature regime classes relate to the soil temperature at 0.3 m depth. The classes used originate from and are described more fully in Webb and Wilson (1995), which in turn is based on the work of Aldridge (1982, 1984) and Aldridge and Cook (1983).

Layer ID 48107
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 107298
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

FSL Flood Return Interval

5329
293
Added
04 Jun 2010

This dataset was first added to LRIS Portal on 04 Jun 2010.

The New Zealand Fundamental Soil Layer originates from a relational join of features from two databases: the New Zealand Land Resource Inventory (NZLRI), and the National Soils Database (NSD). The NZLRI is a national polygon database of physical land resource information, including a soil unit. Soil is one in an inventory of five physical factors (including rock, slope, erosion, and vegetation) delineated by physiographic polygons at approximately 1:50,000 scale. The NSD is a point database of soil physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics for over 1500 soil profiles nationally. A relational join between the NZLRI dominant soil and derivative tables from the NSD was the means by which 14 important soil attributes were attached to the NZLRI polygons. Some if these attributes originate from exact matches with NSD records, while others derive from matches to similar soils or professional estimates. This layers contains flood return interval attributes. The classes originate from and are described more fully in Webb and Wilson (1995).

Layer ID 48106
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 107298
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

FSL Permeability Profile

4557
297
Added
04 Jun 2010

This dataset was first added to LRIS Portal on 04 Jun 2010.

The New Zealand Fundamental Soil Layer originates from a relational join of features from two databases: the New Zealand Land Resource Inventory (NZLRI), and the National Soils Database (NSD). The NZLRI is a national polygon database of physical land resource information, including a soil unit. Soil is one in an inventory of five physical factors (including rock, slope, erosion, and vegetation) delineated by physiographic polygons at approximately 1:50,000 scale. The NSD is a point database of soil physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics for over 1500 soil profiles nationally. A relational join between the NZLRI dominant soil and derivative tables from the NSD was the means by which 14 important soil attributes were attached to the NZLRI polygons. Some if these attributes originate from exact matches with NSD records, while others derive from matches to similar soils or professional estimates. This layers contains the permeability profile attribute. Permeability is the rate that water moves through saturated soil. The permeability of a soil profile is related to potential rooting depth, depth to a slowly permeable horizon and internal soil drainage. Permeablity classes are from Clayden and Webb (1994).

Layer ID 48105
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 107298
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

FSL Soil Drainage Class

10012
978
Added
04 Jun 2010

This dataset was first added to LRIS Portal on 04 Jun 2010.

The New Zealand Fundamental Soil Layer originates from a relational join of features from two databases: the New Zealand Land Resource Inventory (NZLRI), and the National Soils Database (NSD). The NZLRI is a national polygon database of physical land resource information, including a soil unit. Soil is one in an inventory of five physical factors (including rock, slope, erosion, and vegetation) delineated by physiographic polygons at approximately 1:50,000 scale. The NSD is a point database of soil physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics for over 1500 soil profiles nationally. A relational join between the NZLRI dominant soil and derivative tables from the NSD was the means by which 14 important soil attributes were attached to the NZLRI polygons. Some if these attributes originate from exact matches with NSD records, while others derive from matches to similar soils or professional estimates. This layer contains attributes relating to soil drainage. Soil drainage is described as a class. Drainage classes are assessed using criteria of soil depth and duration of water tables inferred from soil colours and mottles. Drainage classes used here are the same as those used in the NZ Soil Classification (Hewitt 1993), and outlined by Milne et al. (1995).

Layer ID 48104
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 107298
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

LENZ - Induration (Soil Hardness)

5499
232
Added
30 May 2010

This dataset was first added to LRIS Portal on 30 May 2010.

Induration data layer used in the creation of Land Environments of New Zealand (LENZ) classification. The classification layers have been made publicly available by the Ministry for the Environment (see data.mfe.govt.nz/layers/?q=LENZ for to access these layers).

Induration is a measure of how hard the soil is and is quantified by how much force is needed to break the soil. The data defines the induration based on the soil information (from the NZLRI) and the mapped parent material. This induration data layer is differentiated into five classes, Non-indurated (Class 1), Very weakly indurated (2), Weakly indurated (3), Strongly indurated (4), Very strongly (5). The class defined as "0" signifies areas where there are no soil attributes recorded (i.e. high peaks of the Southern Alps). Additional details such as discussion about the accuracy and reliability of the LENZ soil layers and the technical definitions of the categories in this layer are defined in the attached LENZ Technical Guide.

Layer ID 48084
Data type Grid
Resolution 25.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

LENZ - October vapour pressure deficit

4648
178
Added
30 May 2010

This dataset was first added to LRIS Portal on 30 May 2010.

October vapour pressure deficit data layer used in the creation of Land Environments of New Zealand (LENZ) classification. The classification layers have been made publicly available by the Ministry for the Environment (see data.mfe.govt.nz/layers/?q=LENZ for to access these layers).

October vapour pressure deficit, recorded in kPa, is used to estimate the effects of variation in the dryness of the air. The climate station data used in the development of this climate surface were derived from summaries of climate observations published by the New Zealand Meteorological Service, using data collected over the period from 1950-1980. Estimates of the vapour pressure deficit for each month were derived by coupling a 100 m DEM with a thin-plate spline surface fitted to an irregular network of 287 meteorological stations, using humidity and temperature data. The resulting 100 metre layer was then interpolated to 25 metres using bilinear interpolation.

Calculation of the vapour pressure deficit first required estimation of the temperature at 0900 hours, the time at which humidity measurements are made. This was calculated from the measured mean daily minimum and maximum temperatures for each month using a function that simulates the temperature course through the day. The estimated temperature at 0900 hours was then used to calculate the saturation water vapour pressure , which indicates the maximum amount of water vapour able to be held in the air given its temperature. Vapour pressure deficits in October were used in LENZ as this is the month when westerly winds are generally most persistent, resulting in strong geographic variation in vapour pressure deficits across New Zealand.

This layer has been multiplied by a factor of 100 (i.e. converted into an integer grid) to save space and make the grids more responsive. A value of 33 is actually 0.33 kPa.

Additional details such as the climate station locations used in the creation of the layer and error maps are defined in the attached LENZ Technical Guide.

Layer ID 48091
Data type Grid
Resolution 25.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Mean minimum temperature of the coldest month data layer used in the creation of Land Environments of New Zealand (LENZ) classification. The classification layers have been made publicly available by the Ministry for the Environment (see data.mfe.govt.nz/layers/?q=LENZ for to access these layers).

Mean minimum temperature of the coldest month is recorded in °C. The climate station data used in the development of this climate surface were derived from summaries of climate observations published by the New Zealand Meteorological Service, using data collected over the period from 1950-1980. Estimates of the mean minimum temperature in July, the coldest month of winter, were derived from a surface fitted to monthly estimates of mean daily temperatures. The resulting data layer was created by coupling a 100 m DEM with a thin-plate spline surface fitted to an irregular network of 346 meteorological stations. The resulting 100 metre layer was then interpolated to 25 metres using bilinear interpolation.

This layer has been multiplied by a factor of 10 (i.e. converted into an integer grid) to save space and make the grids more responsive. A value of 53 is actually 5.3 °C.

Additional details such as the climate station locations used in the creation of the layer and error maps are defined in the attached LENZ Technical Guide.

Layer ID 48092
Data type Grid
Resolution 25.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

LENZ - Exchangeable calcium

3092
139
Added
30 May 2010

This dataset was first added to LRIS Portal on 30 May 2010.

Exchangeable calcium data layer used in the creation of Land Environments of New Zealand (LENZ) classification. The classification layers have been made publicly available by the Ministry for the Environment (see data.mfe.govt.nz/layers/?q=LENZ for to access these layers).

This data layer is a measure of how much exchangeable calcium is held within the soil. The amount of exchangeable calcium defined in the data layer is derived by the soil information (from the NZLRI) and the mapped parent material. Four classes of exchangeable calcium, ranging from Low (1), through to Very High (4). The class defined as "0" signifies areas where there are no soil attributes recorded (i.e. high peaks of the Southern Alps).

Additional details such as discussion about the accuracy and reliability of the LENZ soil layers and the technical definitions of the categories in this layer are defined in the attached LENZ Technical Guide.

Layer ID 48087
Data type Grid
Resolution 25.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Chemical limitations to plant growth data layer used in the creation of Land Environments of New Zealand (LENZ) classification. The classification layers have been made publicly available by the Ministry for the Environment (see data.mfe.govt.nz/layers/?q=LENZ for to access these layers).

This data layer defines three classes of soil based on factors that lead to the accumulation of chemicals that limit plant growth. Classes were differentiated either by their parent material or by their position in the New Zealand Soil Classification. Three classes of chemical limitations, Low (1), Moderate (2) and High (3). The class defined as "0" signifies areas where there are no soil attributes recorded (i.e. high peaks of the Southern Alps).

Additional details such as discussion about the accuracy and reliability of the LENZ soil layers and the technical definitions of the categories in this layer are defined in the attached LENZ Technical Guide.

Layer ID 48086
Data type Grid
Resolution 25.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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